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Events and Announcements from the Blog

May
19

2015

Support MountainChild’s Run for Hope 5K!

Support MountainChild’s Run for Hope 5K! An event for our Nepal Earthquake Response is coming up and is an exciting opportunity to raise awareness and financial resources for the children of the Himalayas. If you are anywhere in the USA, you can register to “Sleep In” to CARRY HOPE and still receive a race t-shirt.

EVENT DESCRIPTION:
Saturday, June 20th, 2015 at Stroh Ranch Park in Parker, CO
8:00 AM - 5K run/walk
Open to all - families, children, and even those who want to sleep in!

Click the link now and ‪#‎jointheresponse‬ by participating in the race or sleeping in from the comforts of your home anywhere in the USA.

http://mountainchildrunforhope.brownpapertickets.com

May
18

2015

For years, talks of “the big one” circled around Nepal

For years, talks of “the big one” circled around Nepal, fear stemming from stories of the last major earthquake in 1934 which killed more than 8,500 and devastated the country. We hoped the seemingly inevitable “big one” wouldn’t be worse, that perhaps nearly a century of structural advancements and earthquake safety preparations would help.
However, it is with heavy hearts that we share the report that the number of people killed in Nepal by the two most recent major earthquakes has now surpassed 8,500, making the disaster the deadliest to hit the Himalayan country on record. Rescuers are still searching for dozens missing in remote villages.
The effort to rebuild Nepal will not be easy or quick - it will take years. But we are committed to this country and it’s beautiful people, and are honored to come alongside them and see Nepal restored! If you want to join us, please donate at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate

http://www.reuters.com/…/us-quake-nepal-idUSKBN0O20LL201505…

May
18

2015

MountainChild was invited to speak at the Nepalese Association fundraiser this weekend at UAB

MountainChild was invited to speak at the Nepalese Association fundraiser this weekend at UAB. We are glad to see communities around the world gathering together to spread awareness and raise resources for the work being done in Nepal. Now is the time for us - all of us - to join together and rebuild Nepal.

May
17

2015

Every little bit helps in the effort to rebuild Nepal

A team of our Nepali staff recently returned from a trip to Arughat in Gorkha where they were delivering aid and doing assessments. They also brought water filters to the village to help provide clean drinking water in hopes of minimizing water-born illnesses. Every little bit helps in the effort to rebuild Nepal and restore hope in the lives of it’s beautiful people! ‪#‎CarryHope‬

May
17

2015

Our RANCH children jumped in to help provide food and shelter!

After hearing the news that one of our RANCH parent’s entire village had been destroyed, our RANCH children jumped in to help provide food and shelter! They have spent the past 2 days delivering aid and playing with the children of this village. We are so proud of them for joining in with our efforts to ‪#‎CarryHope‬!
When you donate, this is where your money is going. It is going to villages in the form of food, water, shelter and blankets to real people who have lost everything. Hope looks like something, and your giving is a real part of that hope!

If you want to join the response, donate at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate

May
17

2015

Thankfully, we were able to build her this temporary shelter in less than 5 hours!

For our staff, some of our relief efforts have really hit close to home. In addition to providing food and shelter for those in far-off villages, many of our own family have been affected.
The mother of one of our staff members lost her home in the quake. Thankfully, we were able to build her this temporary shelter in less than 5 hours! These shelters are able to be put up quickly and efficiently, are much more substantial, and will be able to withstand the monsoon rains. Carrying Hope both near and far!

May
15

2015

You truly are making a difference!

It is a race against time to provide shelter for the thousands of people left homeless as monsoon clouds swell in the distance. What little shelter was left in many villages after the April 25th quake collapsed or were left shaky after the second quake.
In this MSN article, the Nepal Prime Minister states, “We were not prepared for a second quake.” People are pouring in to government buildings to try to receive aid, only to be frustrated by the lack of supplies. The need is just too great.
Thankfully, with the help of our supporters that has come flooding in, we are able to do everything we can to provide relief to villages that are receiving none. We cannot thank you enough for all of your support. You truly are making a difference!
http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate

Photo Cred: AP / Bikram Rai

May
15

2015

Our RANCH kids have been meeting to develop a plan

There are so many villages that were completely destroyed that still need food, water and shelter. The landslides have made traveling to these areas extremely difficult, and the need is so great.
The village our RANCH house parent is from has been completely devastated, and we are doing all we can to provide relief for his home. Our RANCH kids have been meeting to develop a plan for gathering supplies and delivering aid to the area. These are some photos from their recent meeting as they prepare to ‪#‎CarryHope‬ to his village! We are so proud of them and their willingness to serve!

May
15

2015

There is always hope!

As we have shared earlier, our Gateway Project in Khorla Besi was destroyed in the earthquake by a massive boulder tumbling down the mountain.
This area is extremely difficult to get to, and is even hard for helicopters to land on the steep terrain. However, we are able to use a flat patch of our land next to the guest house as a landing pad for helicopters to bring in aid! Even in destruction, there is always hope! These are photos from our relief drop this week, bringing food and supplies into the area.
If you want to join the relief response, you can donate at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate

May
13

2015

We haven’t yet been able to hear from our friends

The big news agencies have been reporting that the epicenter of yesterday’s big quake was near Naamche and Everest. So many people know those names, because they are popular trekking destinations.
In reality, the epicenter was directly over a less glamorous area, one that the media isn’t talking about, but one in which we have spent much time, Bigu. In Bigu, there is a female only monastery (nunnery) called Bigu Gompa, that is one of the oldest, largest, but least visited monasteries in the Himalayas. We have frequented Bigu and the surrounding villages of Syakhu, and Alampu to deliver crucial medical and educational supplies. These are also areas where we have administered water quality testing to determine the need for clean water projects. We have included pictures of the areas before the quake.
We haven’t yet been able to hear from our friends or the village leaders to determine the amount of destruction that occurred.
Please remember the forgotten ones, the ones cut off from modern progress, the ones who desperately need hope.
To donate to the relief response, visit http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate

May
13

2015

We’ve had more than 150 earthquakes or aftershocks since April 25th

“It’s weird hearing about Nepal’s second earthquake on the news. We’ve had more than 150 earthquakes or aftershocks since April 25th. I wish it was only the second earthquake.” - MountainChild Nepal Staff Member
The second major quake has caused even more aftershocks to continue throughout the region. This hasn’t been a two-time event. The constant shaking has everyone on edge, never knowing when the next one will hit or how big it will be.
In the midst of such devastation, any bit of relief we are able to deliver brings hope to a seemingly hopeless situation. We are honored to have the opportunity to help provide basic necessities to those who have lost everything. There is always hope!

May
12

2015

Thankful to have access to helicopters to get food and shelter to these villages

As we end our day in the US, our field-workers in Nepal are beginning another strenuous day of providing aid to villages that are in desperate need. We have two separate trips planned this morning by helicopter to bring much needed supplies to areas that have yet to receive aid. Thankful to have access to helicopters to get food and shelter to these villages!

May
12

2015

At least 60 people have died and more than 1,000 were injured

The latest reports are saying at least 60 people have died and more than 1,000 were injured from Tuesday’s massive 7.3 earthquake, and the aftershocks have not stopped. The threat of landslides has now increased, and monsoon season is only making the situation worse.
The already devastated country continues to be shaken, making relief efforts even more urgent. Please consider partnering with us to bring aid to those hit the hardest. Together we can ‪CarryHope‬!

http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate/

May
12

2015

Another earthquake, this one a 7.4 magnitude struck

Just when we thought things may be settling down, another earthquake, this one a 7.4 magnitude struck just 83 kilometers east of Kathmandu, leaving many more dead.
Buildings that were weakened by the 7.8-magnitude quake less than three weeks ago collapsed, according to reports.
We will let you know more as we learn more as large aftershocks are still occurring, the most recent ones coming in at 5.6 and 6.3 magnitudes.

Please remember the people of Nepal, as things are far from over.

May
12

2015

7.4 magnitude earthquake hits Nepal. Again.

7.4 magnitude earthquake hits Nepal. Again.

May
11

2015

Hope through HEALTH

Hope through HEALTH: Remote mountain villages already lack adequate sufficient medical care and clean water. In the aftermath we are hearing stories of villagers that survived the earthquake to only die because they couldn’t get medical attention. Because medical teams are staying in the valley, those in the villages are left to suffer. On top of the initial catastrophe, reports of measles and cholera outbreaks, amongst those ½ million that are displaced, are beginning to surface.
MountainChild is and will continue tackling health issues at the source and rescuing children from certain and imminent death through this terrible time.

May
11

2015

Blazing trails for hope

Blazing trails for hope. Many of you have been asking about these guys who set out on foot to try and reach Nubri by any way possible. The good news is, they made it! While the trails are far from passable, the guys made their way painstakingly through landslides, rockslides, and rubble to get to the people that have been unequivocally cut off from outside assistance.

May
11

2015

Hope in Sama

Hope in Sama. MountainChild staff helicoptered up to the village of Sama in the Nubri Valley to provide rice, lentils, tarps, ropes, and medicine to this remote area that is cut off from any roads or trekking routes. We distributed the lentils in jerry cans so they could be re-used to hold water. Our team worked with the village leaders to discuss the best ways to evenly disseminate the supplies, then got to work distributing them across the village.

May
11

2015

It is Mother’s Day and we salute all our friends and supporters who are mothers

It is Mother’s Day and we salute all our friends and supporters who are mothers. Our hearts continue to go out to all of the mothers who lost their children and/or families in the recent earthquake tragedy, but are continually reminded of the strength, beauty and resiliency of the Nepali people.
Kudos to this strong mom as she has already rebuilt the wall behind her that fell during the earthquake! Beauty is already rising from the ashes of the disaster.

Happy Mother’s Day to moms near and far.

May
10

2015

100 yaks died in the Sama region as a result of the earthquake

100 yaks died in the Sama region as a result of the earthquake. We have also heard that many donkeys died during the disaster. These working animals, also known as beasts of burden, are some villages only method of transporting goods, and without them, outside help is even more crucial.
These villagers are using the meat from the yaks to sustain themselves since the only crops they can grow in the high altitudes of their village are potatoes and barley.

May
10

2015

Where once, beautiful picturesque villages perched on the terraced hillsides of mountains

Where once, beautiful picturesque villages perched on the terraced hillsides of mountains, now rubble and tarps dot the highland slopes.

May
09

2015

We have now delivered crucial aid & supplies to the remote village of Prok

We have now delivered crucial aid & supplies to the remote village of Prok. Prok is seated within the Manaslu conservation area and is cut off from aid, like so many others, by landslides and impassable trekking trails.

May
09

2015

Hope in the mountains

Hope in the mountains. We are so thankful for these two girls who work at the health post in the village of Sama that we just returned from. They are the nurses for 200 houses and see 10-12 patients a day. They were running low on several medicines (mostly children’s oral antibiotics and hypertension pills - too much butter tea and alcohol) and had no way to get more medicine because all the roads were destroyed by the earthquake. We phoned this information back to MountainChild.org Kathmandu offices and Sujan ran all over Kathmandu and bought several boxes of essential medicines that were sent to Sama on the helicopter that picked us up. Carrying hope to the Himalayas!

May
08

2015

MountainChild has been doing an assessment of the Nubri and Tsum valleys

MountainChild has been doing an assessment of the Nubri and Tsum valleys by both land and air. You saw the original picture of the obvious destruction of the gateway project in an earlier post. Here are some new ones from both the land and air where you can more clearly see the boulder that ripped the building apart. It reminds us of how grateful we are that no one was hurt.

May
08

2015

A video update on MountainChild’s relief response to the people of the Nubri valley

A video update on MountainChild’s relief response to the people of the Nubri valley in the northern Gorkha district. Under normal circumstances, the Nubri valley is a 4-5 day walk from the nearest road. With much of the trail destroyed by the earthquake, the people of Nubri face food shortages as they come to the end of their winter rations. MountainChild responded immediately by bringing in temporary shelter materials and food to sustain the villagers until the road can be repaired.

May
08

2015

Hope delivered to Ripchet


Hope delivered to Ripchet. As another of our helicopters lands in the Tsum Valley, there are children and parents in line waiting to receive crucial life-saving supplies. The houses, a school, and a monastery in this village were demolished in the quake. Without a health post nearby, the villagers are in desperate need.

May
08

2015

Hope in Sama

Hope in Sama. Supplies and hope have now been delivered to the very remote village of Sama. This remote village sits in the Nubri valley at an elevation of 3,500 meters at the base of Mount Manaslu, the 8th highest mountain in the world.

May
08

2015

Hope will rebuild


Hope will rebuild. On a trip to deliver aid to the remote regions via helicopter, we were able to hover just above our Gateway Project and see this. The building looks to have withstood the earthquake, but was literally cut in half by the large boulder you see in the bottom left of the photo.

We are so grateful that our leaders and indigenous staff members that run the project are safe.

May
07

2015

Hope goes remote.


Hope goes remote.
We have landed in the remote village of Lho and have delivered crucial supplies to the Tibetan villagers in desperate need.
Thank you to everyone who has made this possible.

http://www.mountainchild.org/donate

May
06

2015

Hope Continues

Hope Continues. It is the start of another morning in Nepal and our teams are headed back to the remote villages to carry hope and deliver relief supplies!

You can get involved in the response by donating at http://www.mountainchild.org

May
06

2015

The first helicopter drop of supplies in Chhekampar was received

The first helicopter drop of supplies in Chhekampar was received with such thankfulness and awe from the villagers. Thank you for your support and efforts to carry hope to Nepal!

Carry hope at http://www.mountainchild.org

May
06

2015

Hope Shines Through Long-term Focus.

Hope Shines Through Long-term Focus.
The agenda of MountainChild, to empower Himalayan children with the skills to become carriers of hope to their people, is driven by 5 Core Issues; health, trafficking, education, child labor, and environment, each of which plays an integral role in rehabilitation and community development in the aftermath of the earthquake’s devastation.
The root source of suffering echoes throughout the core issues, but now in the midst of destruction, the alarm is blaring and we are listening.
The issues serve as a platform for our long-term focus, which will only be accomplished through empowering the next generation of mountain children. The task will not be finished when the first one, two, or three rounds of crucial aid is delivered. The task will only be complete when the people of the Himalayas receive the ultimate gift of hope and a future.
Over the next 5 days, we will be highlighting our 5 Core Issues and the work being accomplished through each.

Join the response at http://www.mountainchild.org

May
06

2015

Delivering food, water, tarps and other critical supplies

Two separate teams from two different locations in Nepal headed to the remote areas of Nubri and Tsum to begin delivering food, water, tarps and other critical supplies. These were our necessary vehicles to carry hope! Please keep the remote villages of the Himalayas, its incredible people, and our staff in your thoughts!

Carry Hope at http://www.mountainchild.org

May
05

2015

Staff update: Grocery stories have re-opened in parts of Kathmandu but many are in complete disarray

Staff update: Grocery stories have re-opened in parts of Kathmandu but many are in complete disarray. They have stuff spilled everywhere. One near our house just opened their window and let you peek your head in and ask for stuff and they climb over their store and try to find it and then hand it to you out the window. But there are broken jars and opened boxes and stuff all over the floor. So crazy.

May
05

2015

Today is World Hand Hygiene Day


Today is World Hand Hygiene Day.
MountainChild has a long-standing WASH (WAter, Sanitation and Hygiene) program in the remote mountain villages. Over the coming weeks and months, quite a bit of emphasis will be placed on proper hygiene to prevent the spread of water-borne diseases, especially considering the conditions after the earthquake and the onset of monsoon season.

May
05

2015

Hope Is Being Delivered!

Hope Is Being Delivered! Supplies have been mobilized and are about to be delivered to the remote areas of Nubri and Tsum. These are areas that have historically only been accessible by difficult trekking of 5 - 8 days. Damage caused by the earthquake has literally cut off these areas from the world and they have yet to receive relief supplies. That is changing!
As we post this, it is the beginning of night in Nepal but our incredible staff is still tirelessly working to get supplies to those who need it most. Several MountainChild staff members are on there way to Pokhara with two large trucks filled with supplies for Nubri and Tsum. The Nepali Army has agreed to transport the supplies by helicopter first thing in the morning.
This means that more than 6 tons of tarps, rope, rice, and lentils are being carried in to our remote villages on more than 10 helicopter trips early tomorrow morning. This will provide much needed relief for 8,000 villagers who have not received any aid yet and are feeling forgotten. We are also planting 7 more foreign & Nepali staff in these remote villages to distribute aid, show love and care on the people, and do assessments of damage, trails, etc, so we can begin to develop our long-term strategies for helping these communities rebuild.
This is incredibly exciting news for the people in the remote areas who are in desperate need. We are hopeful that the weather conditions stay stable to allow for the helicopters to go and please remember our staff in your thoughts as they will be entering into the remote areas to help deliver supplies and complete the first damage assessment of these truly remote areas.
Join the response from wherever you are by visiting http://www.mountainchild.org

May
05

2015

Check out her story here

This young lady finished an internship with us just 5 days before the earthquake struck. Check out her story here.

http://www.dailyexaminer.com.au/news/stirred-not-shaken/2625526/#.VUQxHuBV2Vo.mailto

May
04

2015

The death toll has now topped 7,200 and is still climbing

Hope for Langtang and other remote villages.
The death toll has now topped 7,200 and is still climbing.
Here are some before and after pictures of Langtang valley, an area that we have worked in extensively over the last couple of years and an area we know a lot of you have visited. Of the approximately 300 people in this village, only a handful are thought to have survived.

To donate, visit http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate

May
04

2015

Carrying Hope Requires Overcoming Huge Obstacles

Drone footage shot by CNN shows villages in Nepal in need of aid, but are unreachable due to landslides.

Posted by I live in Kathmandu City on Friday, May 1, 2015

Carrying Hope Requires Overcoming Huge Obstacles. The video shows incredible footage of villages in Nepal in need of aid, but are unreachable due to landslides. It is quite powerful and heart-breaking imagery. After watching this video, know that these villages were once accessible by road, or what we consider ‘rural Nepal’. MountainChild’s focus over the last 15+ years has been to carry hope to the remote villages of Nepal; these are villages that are only accessible by foot and beyond the end of the road, requiring overcoming arduous terrain in the Himalayas and multiple days of trekking with supplies on your back. As you can imagine, if access is difficult to these villages once available by road, now think about the villages beyond this only accessible by foot. However, MountainChild is focused on getting to these neglected villages with critical relief supplies, whether by foot or by helicopter. What remains intact is MountainChild’s resolve to see hope amongst these remote communities. We have been overcoming the adversities of getting to the unreachable prior to the earthquake and continue to do so today because we know that carrying hope requires overcoming huge obstacles.

Carry Hope with us by visiting http://www.mountainchild.org.

May
04

2015

101-year-old man rescued one week after Nepal quake

Police: 101-year-old man rescued one week after Nepal quake
What a wonderful story of the hope that shines through the darkness!

http://www.cnn.com/2015/05/03/asia/nepal-earthquake/

May
04

2015

Everyone is looking for hope

Everyone is looking for hope.
This man’s house is still standing but has many cracks and is structurally unsafe. In the second picture, you see his home that was damaged and in the last one, his family’s new home, a makeshift tent.
So many in Nepal are living in the same conditions, under a makeshift tent, nearing monsoon season, and with very little or no food.
Our goal in carrying hope is to help Nepal rebuild one step at a time.

http://www.mountainchild.org

May
04

2015

Bringing Hope by Foot

Bringing Hope by Foot. It is now morning in Nepal and MountainChild is sending the only overland team up to the far northern Ghorka District, which is only accessible by foot. They will go to Arughat, Khorlabesi, and Nubri. This is very familiar territory for some of these men as several of them are from the remote villages in this area. However, they are going to have to navigate new terrain as the trails into that area have been completely covered by landslides. These guys will be climbing over these landslides and making their way to the remote areas over the next week to bring relief to these villagers. Please keep them in your thoughts. This is a dangerous & difficult task!

Join the response at http://www.mountainchild.org.

May
02

2015

A big shout out and THANK YOU

A big shout out and THANK YOU to these groups for raising awareness and funds for MountainChild’s Emergency Relief Response!

May
02

2015

Finding water and food for his family is his most urgent need right now

This man stands in front of the rubble that used to be his home. He used to make and sell roti, but he lost his job 2 years ago. He has one son who is 6 years old. His wife works as a house helper and makes about $60 per month working 6 days per week. He says that he has lost everything in his house.
He said that he hears the relief planes always coming in and going, every day. However, he wonders if any aid will ever reach him. He says finding water and food for his family is his most urgent need right now.
http://www.mountainchild.org

May
02

2015

Hope together. MountainChild staff had a very busy day today!

Hope together. MountainChild staff had a very busy day today! This included our Nepali staff, foreign staff, friends, Nepali staff family members, foreign staff children, and even a random man from Croatia all helping. Together, 2.9 tons of dal and rice were prepared for distribution to the remote areas. In addition, we have purchased enough tarp, rope, food, and water jugs to provide desperately needed shelter and food for all 8,000 people in the 25 villages in the Nubri and Tsum Valleys in the very northern, remote parts of Gorkha District (where we have many long-term projects). It typically takes 7 days to hike into these areas, but because the trails have been destroyed by the earthquake, our only option is to use a helicopter to air lift these supplies in. We are grateful that we have access to one of only 13 helicopters in the country right now!
Join the response at http://www.mountainchild.org

May
02

2015

We can be a part of restoring this broken country

Today I met 30 people living in one tent, all from the same village in the district of Dolakha. After their entire village was destroyed, these villagers walked to the main road where they finally caught an all-day bus to Kathmandu. Now they are camped in the middle of Kathmandu with nothing but what the government has given them: one tent, one bottle of water per person, and one package of ramen noodles per person. Among the 30 people in the tent are two babies: a four month old and a baby that was only 5 days old when the earthquake struck. The babies look tiny and malnourished, barely able to keep their eyes open. I desperately wanted to give them money, but looked around me and saw hundreds of other tents who are in the same situation. How could I help? How could I give money to one tent and not another? I don’t have enough resources for them all. I went home heart broken. That night as I was picturing the babies faces’ in my mind, I realized that I can’t help them all, but if we rally together we can help them all. Not just me. Not just you. But altogether, everyone pitching in, we can be a part of restoring this broken country.

Join the response at http://www.mountainchild.org.

May
02

2015

We are 87.8% matched!

Thank you friends and supporters! We are 87.8% matched! Some very generous donors agreed to match all giving this week up to $150,000 towards our Nepal Earthquake Emergency Relief Efforts and we are almost there! We encourage you to keep giving because the need is great! If you give now, your $100 will double to $200, $1,000 to $2,000! Don’t miss this opportunity!
Join the response at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate and choose “Give to the Greatest Need” or by texting your gift amount and the word RELIEF to (210)625-5986 (e.g. $50 RELIEF).

May
01

2015

Hope. It is tangible. A presence


Hope. It is tangible. A presence. A ray of light. Shattering the heavy glass of despair that until now only mirrored the reflection of fear. Hope of relief, of rehabilitation, of community redevelopment, of a future, of something bigger than us.
Hope is coming to Nepal in so many forms. We have gathered supplies, food, tarps, mats, rope, etc., and have just received permission to fly to the remote regions and do an air drop! Until now, there has been a moratorium on helicopters, but we just got word that the army has one and they have given us permission to use it! We had to prove the need, showing population numbers, proving we have enough to meet everyone’s need, getting permits, etc. We must do air drops over each village, because there is not yet a safe place to land, but providing a drop of supplies in the ocean of need gets us one drop closer to quenching that ocean.
Along with the air drop, we sent tarps and ropes to make tents to two extremely affected areas. We also sent enough tarps for 250 people to Arughat in the Gorkha district. We are working through our Ghorka Regional Coordinator and local partners there who will hike the tarps into nearby devastated villages.
Speaking of carrying hope, today the RANCH kids are going out two by two to encourage their neighbors and family members who live in their area. These kids are amazing!
We are also continually in awe of our supporters around the world. We had some very generous donors agree to match all giving for this week up to $150,000 and we are already 65% funded towards that goal! Keep it up and donate online so we can use the entire match! http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate
We have also been encouraged by schools around the globe mobilizing to raise awareness and funds for the relief response here. One school just did a “Break Dress Code Day” where students brought a donation of any size to wear something other than their uniforms! Ideas like this are not only creative, but it teaches the next generation how to care for those in need. Email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) if you would like more information on how your school can get involved.
Hope, the tangible presence of a better and brighter tomorrow; something we can hold on to while shaking off the fear that so wants to creep in. Hope, the definition of peace and the defeat of fear. Carry Hope.

May
01

2015

Fear. It’s almost tangible right now in Nepal

Fear. It’s almost tangible right now in Nepal. Fear of death, another earthquake, buildings collapsing, food shortages, disease. I see it in those around me. But it’s also an involuntary reaction in myself. One night when an airplane flew over the house, I jumped up and ran out of the house before I realized what I was doing. A co-worker woke up in the middle of the night yelling “earthquake” and rushing to get his family out of the house, when everything was fine. Another co-worker who was in her house when the earthquake hit said she fears her house now. When she goes inside her home, the memories of her walls shaking and kids screaming rush back to her.
Fear has a tendency to crowd out reason. Crazy rumors have been circling Kathmandu. There is another “big one” coming at 7pm today according to the Korean Embassy, which wasn’t true. There have even been rumors of a volcano erupting in Nepal.
The only thing greater than fear right now might be desperation. While the people fear their homes collapsing, they also fear living on the streets. So many people are returning to homes that have huge cracks and should be condemned. But without money to rebuild their homes and not wanting to live on the streets, the Nepali people feel they have no choice but to move back into their extremely dangerous homes.

Photo Cred: VOT

Apr
30

2015

They were 5 of the 180 people who died there


This is 23-year-old Binod Karki from Kathmandu. His father died years ago, and he supports his mother with a small cell phone shop that also served as their home. In Saturday’s earthquake, Binod’s shop collapsed, losing all his inventory, his home, and his livelihood. Binod’s family was out viewing the city from the historical, nine-story Bhimsen Tower when it collapsed. They were 5 of the 180 people who died there. Even though Binod is well-educated and entrepreneurial, when asked what his plans were to recover from the terrible disaster, he had no idea.

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Apr
30

2015

Thank you friends of MountainChild org for providing us 30 tarps for one of the village in Nuwakot

Recently posted by a contact in Nuwakot, one of the hardest hit areas:
Thank you friends of MountainChild org for providing us 30 tarps for one of the village in Nuwakot. They are really being used to carry hope in Nepal. Special thanks to S who came in the mean time.

Apr
30

2015

We have mobilized food, tarps, and ropes up to them and the supplies should arrive to them tomorrow

Amidst the unthinkable destruction and arduous undertakings of relief, rehabilitation, and eventually community development in the remote areas, we have a little more information.
One of our Nepali staff members has been in constant contact with the remote villages and heard that there is no way to Nubri, where we have worked for 15 plus years, except by helicopter. We discussed going up the west route to the area by foot and going over Larke Pass, which is crossable, but definitely not with a pack on. We have learned that the Ghap school, that we support, has been pretty much destroyed.
Also, we received word on the MountainChild Gateway Project shown below, of which the only thing standing now is the kitchen. We have partners at the Project that run the guesthouse and we have news they are safe. They have a very baby though, which prevents them from moving out of the area. We have mobilized food, tarps, and ropes up to them and the supplies should arrive to them tomorrow.
While we are working tirelessly to provide relief to the precious people in the remote areas, we are in this for the long run. Our focus is long-term sustainable, empowering work and we aren’t here to place a band-aid on these hurting people, but to get them prepared for empowerment through the next generation.
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Apr
30

2015

We are 51.3% matched


If you haven’t heard, some very generous donors gave a $150,000 match for the next 5 days, which means if you give now, your donation will be doubled! Your $50 will turn into $100, $500 into $1,000!
We are 51.3% matched, so hurry up and give or tell others about this incredible opportunity to double their giving to a well established organization on the ground in Nepal.
Join the response at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate or by texting your gift amount and the word RELIEF to (210)625-5986 (e.g. $50 RELIEF).

Apr
29

2015

We are well on the way! As of right now, 37.7% of the $150,000 match has been met!

We are well on the way! As of right now, 37.7% of the $150,000 match has been met! Keep giving and encourage those around you to give during the next 6 days so your giving will be doubled! If you know someone looking for an organization already on the ground, point them in our direction.
The great focus right now is on relief; providing what is needed to sustain and protect lives during the initials stages of the relief operation and to acquire the necessary financial resources to enable those operations. Eventually, as time and recovery conditions dictate, our focus will turn to rehabilitation and then sustainable community development, which will take years.
Help our ground and air teams get the crucial help needed into the remote areas by donating now at http://www.mountainchild.org or by texting your gift amount and the word RELIEF to (210)625-5986 (e.g. $50 RELIEF).

Apr
29

2015

Wednesday night update

Wednesday night update: Lots of strategizing and networking today. Able to purchase lots of supplies for affected villages. Challenges include getting the supplies to the villages. In normal conditions, porters would hike for a week, carrying supplies on their backs, to reach some of these areas (after driving as far as the road goes). After the earthquake, many hiking trails are completely impassable. We’re working through our relationships with village leaders to figure out the best way for aid to reach them, all the while discussing long-term strategies to help them rebuild their villages.

Apr
29

2015

Not volunteerism is needed at this point

We continue to receive phone calls and messages with people wanting to volunteer. We can’t stress enough, that financial support, not volunteerism is needed at this point. We are already on the ground working to deliver relief and aid, and need your help in the weeks, months, and even years to come.
“Nepal relies on only one international airport to receive and deliver aid. Relief organizations say the tarmac at Tribhuvan International Airport remains jam-packed with a large number of cargo planes.
Several aircraft carrying essential supplies have been turned away, or diverted to India and elsewhere.”

Cred: CNN.com

Apr
29

2015

Join the Response

Text to give today and your donation amount will be doubled! We’ve had some very generous donors offer to match all giving this week up to $150,000! Text your gift amount and the word RELIEF to (210)625-5986 (e.g. $50 RELIEF).
You can also double your online gift by visiting http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate and choosing the “Give to the Greatest Need” option.

Apr
28

2015

The death toll could go up to 10,000

“The death toll could go up to 10,000 because information from remote villages hit by the earthquake is yet to come in,” Sushil Koirala said. As you watch the world news tonight and hear of the horrific devastation spread across Nepal, please remember that you can ‪#‎jointheresponse‬ and help. Time is of the essence and the need is great. Remember that all gifts are matched this week up to $150,000. Give now and turn your $50 gift into $100 at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate or text your gift amount and the word RELIEF to (210)625-5986 (e.g. $50 RELIEF).

Photo Cred: FOXNEWS.com

Apr
28

2015

Emergency Relief Response for the next week up to $150,000 USD!


A very generous group of donors have agreed to match every single dollar of donations given to our Emergency Relief Response for the next week up to $150,000 USD!
That means if you give $10, it will double to $20. Give $100 and it will double to $200! Please consider giving any amount… nothing is too little… nothing is too great. To take advantage of this matching gift opportunity, donate now at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate or text your gift amount and the word RELIEF to (210)625-5986 (e.g. $50 RELIEF)

Apr
28

2015

We are camping outside until it is safe to return to living inside

Most houses are okay in our area but out on the ring road, there are lots of collapsed buildings. Also our local supermarket collapsed with 5 people being killed. All is ok at home still. We pulled water from the well for 3 hours today. There are around 40 people with us in our compound sharing life together. We bought basic food supplies for the month today. There is no phone service in our area most of the time. It’s 1am and we finally got some internet for a short while on the phone, but not even 3G service. CG arrived home safely, but his phone only works intermittently as it fell out into the river as he was running for his life in the mountains on Saturday. Please keep us in your thoughts as we turn from “experience mode” to “how do we now LOVE mode.” We are camping outside until it is safe to return to living inside. Thanks

Apr
28

2015

Most no longer have homes to live in

The areas we are working in were the epicenter of the earthquake and also have been some of the hardest hit. Most if not all homes have been destroyed. The trekking routes in have been destroyed and lots of rain is making it cold and wet and not good to be outside without shelter. Please remember our loved ones and the the families of our RANCH kids especially. We’ve heard from many of their families but not all of them. Most no longer have homes to live in.

Apr
28

2015

To securely make a gift to MountainChild’s Emergency Relief Response

We have wonderful news! A great organization has partnered with us to offer a text-to-give option, if you are in the US.
To securely make a gift to MountainChild’s Emergency Relief Response, text your gift amount and the word RELIEF to (210)625-5986 (e.g. $50 RELIEF).

Apr
28

2015

Initial reports indicate close to 90% destruction with widespread loss of life

As more news comes out of the mountains, we are learning that the remote areas that have defined the mission of MountainChild over the past 15+ years have been catastrophically hit by the affects of the recent earthquake. Initial reports indicate close to 90% destruction with widespread loss of life. Many of the projects and infrastructure that MountainChild has worked so diligently to build over the years has been dealt a significant blow. - JR
If you want to do something to help, support us financially. Your donation of $10, $25, $50, $100, $500 will be given directly to the efforts with no administrative fees or overhead costs taken out. Donate now at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate.

Photo Cred: Bikram Rai

Apr
28

2015

With urgency, we ask you to consider giving to MountainChild’s Emergency Relief Response

With urgency, we ask you to consider giving to MountainChild’s Emergency Relief Response. We are already on the ground working and are in urgent need of donations to continue the ongoing work that will take weeks, months, and even years to fulfill. You can rest assured in knowing that $1 given is $1 going to the efforts with no administrative or overhead fees taken out.
MountainChild’s primary focus and efforts are now in the remote mountainous regions, where besides Kathmandu, the highest death tolls have been reported. When the earthquake struck, one of our staff members was in Arughat, a remote village that was reportedly 90% destroyed and we have heard that a school we support in Ghap has been decimated. We are still waiting to learn about some of our projects like the Gateway Project. We have heard that remote mountain villages have been completely buried or wiped out by rock and landslides and that it will take 2-4 weeks to reach some of them by foot while traversing over those very slides.
We aim to launch ground teams first, then an army of donkeys to carry supplies and helicopter teams as soon as the flight moratorium has been lifted.
Donate now at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate. Scroll to the bottom of the page and choose, “Give to the Greatest Need” and your tax-deductible donation amount to have a part in the task. You are needed.

Photo Cred: BG

Apr
28

2015

It’s been 3 days since the earthquake hit Nepal.

Three very, very long days.
The first day was one of the SCARIEST days of my life. There were over 30 aftershocks the first day alone, and it wasn’t just the quakes that were scary but the fear and anticipation of how big and when the next one would be. It felt like the earth was never gonna stop shaking, and we were all just waiting for every building around us to fall. Time seemed to drag on and on as we endured more and more aftershocks. Right about the time I felt a little more relaxed, another big one would hit. When will it every stop? Silver lining: spending all day with the RANCH kids, who were with us, when the earthquake hit. We got to camp outside for 24 hours with some of my favorite people in the world! One RANCH girl said, “It’s like a sleepover, but scary.”
The second day was one of the SADDEST days of my life. Our dear Nepali friend lost his mother when their shop collapsed on top of her. We spent all day with the family, buying wood for the cremation, searching for drinking water, and wondering how in the world we could console the dozens of weeping people (from the dozens of diseased) all around us. Everyone around me was in agony, hopeless, desperate, empty, and beyond consolation. The agony seemed so unexpected (even though the earthquake had been anticipated for years) and like it would never end.
The third day was one of the most EXHAUSTING days of my life. It didn’t help that I had slept the past two nights in a tent and then a car. The earthquakes were small enough that people felt comfortable to start venturing out more. It was also long enough since the first quake that people were starting to run out of food in their homes. So it felt like all day was spent on a scooter running errands: searching for any store that was open so I could buy petrol, tarps, ropes, water, medicine, food. I also drove around for hours searching for an American friend who was missing. Silver lining: our friend is safe and it was beautiful to see all our staff (who have been staying together) work together each doing their own part: some taking care of the kids, others cooking, others organizing, some buying supplies, a few brainstorming how to get electricity and water in our houses.

Apr
27

2015

We have great news!

We have great news! We have heard from our national leaders in the Jumla area. They and the children at the Jumla RANCH are accounted for and safe!

Apr
27

2015

Get crucial supplies and aid to the remote villages

While we love our volunteers and know that they are beneficial to carrying hope to the people of Nepal, we urge people to stay home for now. We are thankful for your heart to help, but Nepal is still in a time of assessment and relief and we are working to provide people with even the most basic of needs like food, water, shelter, etc.
Now, more than ever, we need people to partner financially in order to get crucial supplies and aid to the remote villages. Join the response by donating now at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate/.

Apr
27

2015

MountainChild’s primary focus and efforts are in the remote mountainous regions

MountainChild’s primary focus and efforts are in the remote mountainous regions, where besides Kathmandu, the highest death tolls have been reported. When the earthquake struck, one of our staff members was in Arughat, a remote village that was reportedly 90% destroyed and we have heard that a school we support in Ghap has been decimated. Many remote mountain villages have been completely buried or wiped out by rock and landslides. Because roads are blocked, efforts to reach the villages are limited to trekking unsafe mountain trails with limited supplies or deploying helicopter teams.
According to this article, the highest death tolls are being reported in the Nuwakot, Dhading, Gorkha, Lalitupur, Bhaktapur, Rasuwa, and Sindhupalchok districts where local villagers have been left to fend for themselves, sometimes digging out trapped relatives with their bare hands.
Please consider partnering with us in our earthquake relief response by giving online at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate/.

Articel: NEPALITIMES.com

Apr
27

2015

MountainChild relief efforts have begun!

MountainChild relief efforts have begun! Our staff on the ground has been actively searching for fuel, water, tarps, medicine, water jugs, rope and other supplies to begin to distribute to the villages, while solar charging panels, water filters, and satellite phones are being brought in from the US. Furthermore, MountainChild is beginning to develop a more definitive plan for assessing the damage and need. The devastation is great, so we will be examining the overall need and determining how we utilize our staff and resources to best respond. The focus right now is on providing what is needed to sustain and protect lives during the initials stages of the relief operation. Please consider giving to MountainChild’s emergency relief efforts and join the response of providing these basic, essential, life sustaining supplies. http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate/

Apr
27

2015

Please continue to lift Nepal in your thoughts

The death toll has soared past 3,700, even without a full accounting from vulnerable mountain villages that rescue workers were struggling to reach two days after the disaster. Please continue to lift Nepal in your thoughts! To join the MountainChild Emergency Relief Response by donating, visit,

Apr
27

2015

We are all in this together

Nepalis from around the globe are uniting in support and memory of those lost and hurting. A group from Alabama held a candlelight vigil tonight at the University of Alabama at Birmingham campus. We are all in this together.

Apr
27

2015

A recent staff update from Nepal…

It is now 5:45am Monday morning - another night of sleeping outside on the ground with many aftershocks continuing. They are smaller and less frequent than yesterday. A thunderstorm and rain added to the “excitement” last night so many more people crammed in under the shelter to avoid getting wet. Again not too much sleep. We have access to plenty of rice and daal, enough water for today and as long as the sun shines our solar inverter will be ok to keep phones charged. There is still no power in this side of town which means we can do nothing more than that. We are searching for a generator but all shops were completely closed yesterday all day - even grocery stores. Water will be our primary concern because the city water line which fills the underground tank hasn’t been working for the past few days so whatever is in the tank is all we have for now. Please continue to lift us and this country up in your thoughts over these next few days especially as much needed relief needs to get to the right places and be distributed to the most urgent needs.

Apr
27

2015

The people of Nepal urgently need your help

Thank you for following our updates. We are on the ground providing compassionate care and relieving the suffering of those affected and we couldn’t do it without you.
Our strategic response will be laid out in three distinct stages; relief, rehabilitation, and community development. Each stage will take time, but we are here to CARRY HOPE for the long run and will continue to need partners like you.
Because this deadly earthquake was so devastating, estimated to be 16 times more powerful than the 2010 Haiti earthquake, the people of Nepal are hurting for even the most basic of needs. As we are able to continue assessment and providing relief, we ask that you join us by donating to the emergency relief response. You can donate two ways, either online at http://www.mountainchild.org or by emailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for other donation options. The people of Nepal urgently need your help.

Apr
27

2015

Sunday that thousands of homes were destroyed and 80% of schools razed

These men are collecting hay for a Hindu burial. Mass cremations have taken over Pashupati temple along the Bagmati river as death tolls climb to nearly 2,500 people and are still rising.
The best guess is that it will take days and even weeks for specialists to reach the remote areas, especially those close to the quake’s epicenter. Large parts of the mountainous region remain cut off due to the damage and continued landslides.
“Uddav Timilsina, chief district officer of Gorkha, near the quake’s epicenter, said Sunday that thousands of homes were destroyed and 80% of schools razed. He said 500 police and soldiers were hunting for survivors and recovering bodies of the dead.”
Our brothers and sisters in Nepal need our help. MountainChild has created an Emergency Relief Response and needs you to ‪#‎jointheresponse‬. Donate now at http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate/, scroll to the bottom of the page and choose “Give to the Greatest Need” where the greatest need now is emergency relief.

Photo Cred: Sarai Smith, Quote: WSJ

Apr
27

2015

Nepal-based MountainChild staff

So many of you have been asking about the Nepal-based MountainChild staff. All Kathmandu based staff are accounted for and safe. We still haven’t heard from some of our remote partners because of the impassibility of roads and lack of communication methods though.
All of the staff has gathered together and are staying outside at night because of the continued aftershocks. Thank you all for your concern over us at this time.

Apr
25

2015
Apr
25

2015

To give to MountainChild’s earthquake response Emergency Relief Efforts

To give to MountainChild’s earthquake response Emergency Relief Efforts via electronic funds transfer rather than through the MountainChild website, email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Apr
25

2015

Nepal experienced today was about 16 times more powerful than the 7.0 quake that devastated Haiti

According to the US Geological Survey, the earthquake Nepal experienced today was about 16 times more powerful than the 7.0 quake that devastated Haiti in 2010.
A magnitude 7 quake is capable of widespread and heavy damage while an 8 magnitude quake can cause tremendous damage. Even the tremors and aftershocks have been ringing in at over 5.0.
Because of that, authorities are urging citizens to stay outside of their homes. With monsoon season rolling in, forecasts are calling for rain and thunder showers with temperatures in the mid-50’s overnight.
Everywhere people are laying on plastic sheets or cardboard boxes, wrapped in blankets. Mothers are attempting to keep their children warm; some lighting fire with whatever wood they can find. This is real, people. And these are real people.


Photo cred, NPR

Apr
25

2015

Deadly heart-wrenching earthquake

In light of today’s deadly heart-wrenching earthquake, the worst the Himalayas have seen in over 80 years, MountainChild is mobilizing its efforts and has created an Emergency Relief Response. MountainChild is on the ground to provide compassionate care, preventing and relieving the suffering of those affected. We are here to serve the people of Nepal in their darkest hour because we know strategic response is essential when disaster strikes.
To get involved in our work on the ground, help us fulfill our mission to Carry Hope to the people of the Himalayas, and provide much needed relief during this devastating crisis, donate now to MountainChild’s Emergency Relief Efforts.
Go to http://www.mountainchild.org/wp/donate/ and scroll to the bottom of the page, choosing the “Give to the Greatest Need” option and your tax-deductible donation amount. Over the next two weeks, all donations not specified toward a particular Core Issue will also be devoted directly to the emergency relief efforts.
We are forever grateful for the support of donors, especially at times like this.

Apr
15

2015

Memories from the Trail

Traveling to the other side of the world to spend time in the remote villages of the Himalayas, I really had no idea what to expect. I was excited to see the mountains, to experience first hand the natural beauty I had only ever seen in photographs. I was excited to be a small part of the good work that MountainChild is doing and to travel and share the experience with close friends. Now that I am home, after spending a week trekking through the Langtang Valley, beside a rushing river, in the shadow of snow-capped peaks, it is not images of the mountains that keep returning to me, but the faces of the people we encountered.

The Tibetan-Buddhist people that call Langtang Valley home are truly amazing. It is easy to romanticize the mountains and their beauty when you are only a visitor. But after a few days in those mountains, I began to see just a glimpse of how difficult it is to make a life there. The villages we visited are only accessible by rough foot trails, some barely hanging on to the side of the mountains. This means that anything the people cannot grow or provide for themselves has to be carried up on the backs of men, women and children, or the occasional donkey train. We passed countless people carrying loads of construction materials on their backs, some loads weighing close to two hundred pounds. They slowly and steadily made their way up trails that we had struggled up with only our small packs. We saw families preparing their rocky fields for spring planting, in the middle of a snow storm, as we hurried on to the next village, seeking shelter. Accomplishing anything in these remote areas requires such difficult manual labor.

In the midst of these difficult conditions, it was amazing to witness the attitude of the people. I saw more smiles than complaints, more warmth than resentment, and in every home we visited, we were welcomed with such genuine hospitality. It is the faces of these people that will stay in my memory long after other images from the trip have faded. The pure laughter of the children, the warm smiles of our hosts as they shared their lives with us, the steadiness and perseverance written on the face of the porters bearing such heavy burdens. These are the images that will come to my mind as I remember this trip. These are the people that make the trip more than worth the cost.

Feb
23

2015

A story from the trail about witnessing the joy of a “Love Marriage”

My recent team from Oregon and I were given the incredible honor to be invited into a wedding reception in a remote village of the Himalayas.  It was the last thing we were expecting to be a part of.  While trekking we came into a village and heard the strange sounds of dance music over a loud speaker.  Passing by the reception the team took the time to have a spontaneous dance party mid-trail.  I think this may have been part of the reason for the invite.

It was an incredible experience.  We met the bride and groom along with many family members, villagers, and other people that traveled great distances to celebrate with them.  We had traditional snacks, food and tea to celebrate.  It was amazing to see and learn that this was a “love marriage” and that the couple was happy to be together and had the support of their family.

Unfortunately, many potential brides in Nepal do not end up with a happy story like this one.  Many Nepali girls are actually sold because of the dowry practice.  When a girl is engaged, her family must offer anywhere from several hundred to several thousand dollars to the grooms family.  On the day of the wedding they have to present gifts that could be worth several years wages.  Because of this, many parents will choose to sell their daughters rather than have them marry.  Trafficking is still very real here in Nepal.  Some of this is due to the traditions and customs families feel they must participate in. 

It’s experiences like these that give us hope to see change in the lives of the Nepali people. Help us raise awareness, carry hope, and fight to end human slavery.

Feb
05

2015

Life of a Tibetan Villager

My recent group had an incredible opportunity to visit villages during an off-season for trekkers. Due to the lack of tourists on the trail, we had unique opportunities to just “hang out” with many of the teahouse owners and their families.

One memorable time was spent in a small village called Ghodatabela. We sat with our teahouse owner and asked questions about his family, culture, way of life and history. He told us about his family and how they had migrated from Tibet down into the valley, and that his family had been there for several generations. His family is part of the Kyerung people group. It was very interesting to learn that even his language was incredibly unique. Although the Kyerung people are considered to be Tibetans in both Tibet and Nepal, their own language is unintelligible with other Tibetan languages.

The family members that settled in the valley had extreme hardships due to the environment. They learned to grow crops in limited seasons, and used animals for work and transportation. Today, this teahouse owner still faces many of the same hardships due to the environment. One ongoing challenge is quality education for his children. He has to send them all the way down to Kathmandu and only sees them a few times a year. He said the closest school in the bigger, more modern village did not have quality education and usually closes most of the winter due to the harsh conditions. It was an amazing opportunity to hear about the history and present situation of this wonderful family. It gave proof to the challenges of village life in the Himalayas for both the adults and children that occupy them.

It’s conversations like these that continuing to drive our passion to provide quality education in more accessible areas for mountain families, and aid in the improvement of farming techniques. If you want to learn more about what MountainChild is doing in the areas of these 2 core issues, check out the “Media” tab on our website to view videos of these issues!

Jan
18

2015

Asha Grace Center Grant

MountainChild is proud to partner with local organizations that are helping to aid Nepali people in an area that aligns with one of our 5 core issues. Last year, MountainChild issued a grant to the Asha Grace Center here in Nepal. The Asha Grace Center was established in 2012 with the goal of helping children of brick factory workers receive an education.

In Nepal, there are more than 500 brick factories in the Kathmandu Valley. The brick factories only operate six months per year due to the rainy and cold seasons in Nepal, which negatively affects their productions. Because of this, most brick factory workers are paid by how many bricks they make, so many times parents will have their kids working along side them in order to produce more bricks per day. Therefore, many children are unable to go to school. Asha Grace Center is specifically geared toward providing an education for these children. Because many families won’t sacrifice having their children gone all day to go to school, Asha provides a 4-hour school day to allow the children to get an education but still help their families work in the factory. They also provide sanitation and health information, like using a toilet, how to wash your hands, the importance of hygiene and more.

The grant from MountainChild provided an educational opportunity for 71 children this past year! We are so thankful to be able to partner with organizations that are doing such amazing work in Nepal. By joining hands with Asha Grace Center, we are both able to Carry Hope to more Nepali’s than we would be able to independently. Thank you for continuing to support our work in Nepal!

Dec
29

2014

Friends in High Places

It had been nearly nine hours since we left the Hidden Monastery. No food left. Hadn’t seen water in four hours. The sun was going down and we were at least ninety minutes from our final destination. As we continued our four-hour descent along the sheer face of the mountain, the warm afternoon sun dipped behind the ridge and gave way to the chilling shade of twilight. A feverish turn that took only seconds.

My team of volunteers was starting to lag behind as we entered the next remote village. It had been a year since I had visited this town. I returned with printed photos of the ethnically Tibetan villagers I had met the previous year. I wound through the narrow lanes, trying hard to make out any familiar faces in the failing light of day.

First there was C*, the baby whose mother had committed suicide after losing a child to the outbreak more than a year before. He was visiting an aunty and looking relatively healthy, though not much larger. I heard his father had remarried.

Next there was P. Her family had also lost a child in the outbreak. A new stone and metal outhouse stood in her front patio area. After the outbreak, more and more villagers began making the connection between hygiene and health. Outhouses like this were becoming more prevalent in the valley.

The villager’s homes were spread sparsely across the narrow plateau of yellow grass and rhododendron trees. “Are we there yet?” slipped from one of the volunteers. We had been in the same village for fifteen minutes, but when the houses are separate by ancestral farmlands it can sometimes take a while to walk to a neighbor’s house.

We hustled on to T’s house. She’s probably only in her early teens. She was taking care of the house and farm alone. Her father had passed away years ago leaving the seven daughters to take care of their mother. The previous week I had actually eaten lunch with T’s mother in Kathmandu. She had travelled five days for a doctor to investigate an ache in her body. After a week of tests, it seems the doctor’s results were still inconclusive and he had required her to stay, leaving T alone even longer. In the coming years, MountainChild, in partnership with village leadership, plans to break ground on a Health Post just 20 minutes from T’s house. Bringing this kind of basic health care to the mountains will alleviate the stress of absent parents and make the decision to go to the doctor an easier one.

One last house. We rounded the corner and announced our presence with a Tibetan greeting, “Tashi Delek!” The clanging of dishes proved we had startled my friend. After a cheerful, but brief volley of small talk, we dismissed ourselves to continue down the mountain to our final destination where a guesthouse for foreigners awaited.

“Where are you going?” she asked. When we told her our intentions she replied with an emphatic, “No! Stay with me!” Her neighbor, who was also a friend, rounded the corner and the two began bickering over who would have the privilege of hosting our team.

Ten minutes later it was pitch black outside. The temperature had plummeted, and we were lounging around the indoor fire sipping tea and swapping stories with our hostesses as they prepared our dinner. Our boots had been joyfully retired at the door and our beds awaited us in the next room. On nights like that one, I was very thankful to have friends in high places.

Many such visits have been made and will continue to be made as MountainChild strengthens its friendship with the people of the Himalayas.

*Names have been changed

Dec
07

2014

Worth the Cost




The trek started easy enough through the beautifully terraced rice fields at the base of the mountain ahead of us. As we continued on, the raw beauty of this place captivated us all. Waterfalls, rugged mountain peaks, sheer cliffs and the tips of snow-capped mountains in the distance were majestic. We were planning to reach Lapu, a remote village, by lunchtime. However, after two of our team members became too ill to continue and the climb became more treacherous, we missed our lunchtime arrival. We sent the sick members back with a guide, and decided to press on.

We reached Lapu several hours after lunch. The villagers greeted us with open arms and warm hearts. It seemed the entire village turned out to welcome us to Lapu. We were off the beaten path and Lapu was not accustomed to receiving many trekkers, which meant we were quite the spectacle in this ancient village. They had heard of our coming and in traditional Nepali custom had prepared a meal to welcome us with.

While they finished preparing the meal, we had the opportunity to speak with the adults and play with the children. And there were many, many children. I watched children play, experiencing bubbles for possibly the first time. I watched true joy, intrigue and uncontrollable laughter as the children (and some adults) chased floating bubbles of soap only to have them “pop” when caught. It was amazing to see the simplicity of their joy! These people have next to nothing, yet their joy in contagious.

After our time with in the village, we headed back from where we came. We knew it was going to get dark sooner than we wanted, so we needed to move quickly. We arrived back at the guesthouse in the dark with cuts, bruises, scrapes, sore knees and screaming legs. But we arrived. As we gathered ourselves for debrief, checked up on our ill team members, ordered food for dinner and simply tried to walk on legs that had no steps left in them, we recounted our time in Lapu. We recounted the smiles. We recounted the laughter. We recounted the joy. We recounted the encounter we shared in Lapu, the opportunity to share life with these beautiful people, if only for one day. Although tired, bruised, sore and unable to walk, we all agreed that our trip to Lapu was worth the cost. It is always worth the cost.

Nov
17

2014

Tears on the Trail


To find someone that is willing to listen to your hearts cry is often a rare moment in life. To find someone or a group that sympathizes and desires to help make that heart cry a reality is another. The later was an unforgettable experience that impacted my life and resulted in my tears on the trail. This experience came from an intimate time with a local villager as she poured out her hearts cry for her family, village, valley and people group. It was a deep cry of desperation, love and fear of future suffering.

I sat with a group of professionals and listened to the heartache and agony as this young girl pleaded for us to remember the plight of the people that surrounded her. The cry for my group was to join our efforts for the people and villages we had encountered on our journey through the valley. “My family is bound in fear,” she stated, as she explained the reality she saw in her village. Death is a daily occurrence in these villages, mostly from easily preventable things such as diarrhea. Many are uneducated and will not seek medical help if it will interfere with the management of their crops.

Twenty minutes of deep crying and a hearts agony were expressed. I identified with the call, the pleading, the desperation; only I was leaving the valley, and she would be left alone with no one to listen to her hearts cry. My heart and emotions were overwhelmed. The thoughts of being remote, days away from any form of medical care or training were heavy. I was challenged as I took an honest view into my own convictions regarding the plight and urgency I felt in my heart for the people that surrounded me. The tears came as an overwhelming awareness of my pitiful state to see beyond myself even when exposed to the suffering of those in front of me. It was a challenge to take action. It was a challenge to go beyond myself and step up to the level of conviction of this young villager.

This young girl is one of our RANCH graduates, and she desires to be a public health worker, the first in her valley. She wants to use this training to better the lives of her people. She recognizes what seems to be an incredibly daunting task before her, but she is determined to make a difference. It is people like her who make what we do so rewarding. Join us in helping her, and many children just like her, realize their dreams of bringing hope back to their villages.

Nov
03

2014

One Simple Act

Our first Explore team of the fall season was a group of women from the US who traveled to a remote village where many of the women are survivors of severe victimization, mostly trafficking. The area they visited was recently in the news due to a massive landslide and flood which claimed dozens (possibly hundreds) of lives. In this same village there are around 100 students in Kindergarten, but only 18 in the 8th grade due to issues like human trafficking and forced child marriages.

During the team’s time in the village they washed the feet and painted the nails of some of the survivors. This may seem like such a simple act for many of us, but to these women it meant more than most are able to comprehend. In this culture, touching another person’s feet is unholy. They believe that touching the feet of another person is a sin. The teams act of servitude showed these women that regardless of their past, they are loved and have value. As the team sat at the feet of these women talking and sharing stories, any barrier of culture, status or background was broken. What an incredible opportunity to carry hope to these women!

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